Stream HTML5 Video from Azure Blob Storage

I’ve been looking into what needs to be done in order to stream videos hosted in Microsoft Azure’s Blob storage with the HTML5 <video> control. Once I got over a few little hiccups, the process was very straight forward.

The Process

I followed the Video On The Web section of the online book Dive Into HTML5 by Mark Pilgrim for the overall process. It provides a couple nice pictures stating which browser supports which codec. I was disappointed with the fact that there isn’t one codec supported by all the mainstream browsers, so to support all you have to have at least 2.

I decided that I would take my video and encode it in the H.264 and OGG formats. NOTE: The document above is a bit old but the steps provide a good idea of what to set to accomplish the encoding. Once the two versions were ready I created a simple .html page and hosted it in my local IIS just to test out that I had done the encoding correctly. Below is what I had.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<h1>Test</h1>
<video width="576" height="320" controls>
	<source src="tbbt_s1e1.mp4"  type='video/mp4; codecs="avc1.42e01e, mp4a.40.2"'>
	<source src="tbbt_s1e1.ogv"  type='video/ogg; codecs="theora, vorbis"'>
</video>
</body>
</html>

The HTML5 <video> control is really straight forward to use. The controls attribute tells the browser to display its prebuilt controls and there are 2 ways to specify the source video file(s). The first way only uses one file so if the browser doesn’t support it, then you can’t watch. The second way is what I followed, and it allowed me to provide multiple video files allowing the browser to choose the codec it supports.

When I viewed the page the video player controls showed up, but the videos didn’t work. The important thing I missed was to make sure IIS had the correct MIME type defined for the videos (MIME Types Rear Their Ugly Head section of the document above). After adding the following MIME types to the root IIS node the videos played.

Extension MIME type
.ogv video/ogv
.mp4 video/mp4

 
With the videos functioning, I then moved on to hosting the video files in my Blob Azure Development Storage and pointing to those files. Previously I had created a little application to upload files to Blob storage, so I used it to upload the files instead of any of the Azure file explorer applications.

I then pointed the .html file above to the Azure urls and got the player again with the video not working.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<h1>Test</h1>
<video width="576" height="320" controls>
	<source src="http://127.0.0.1:10000/devstoreaccount1/videocontainer/c625cff5-6f03-4e89-a8b3-43f29b97f14b.mp4"  type='video/mp4; codecs="avc1.42e01e, mp4a.40.2"'>
	<source src="http://127.0.0.1:10000/devstoreaccount1/videocontainer/4e3f4531-e3d2-407f-8a78-bea8d540d537.ogv"  type='video/ogg; codecs="theora, vorbis"'>
</video>
</body>
</html>

Turns out I ran into the exact same MIME type issue. My application didn’t set the Content Type property of each Blob to the correct type so Azure wouldn’t allow it to be streamed out, but it could be downloaded. To quickly change this I used Azure Storage Explorer to point to my Development Storage and change the Content Type of each of the files to their respective MIME type specified in the table above.

I then browsed to the .html file again and the videos played!

Codec Issues
When encoding the video to the H.264 and OGG formats I ran into a few issues. First I used HandBrake and Firefogg (requires Firefox) respectively to encode the files, but while HandBrake worked, the file Firefogg provided didn’t have audio when played in Firefox. I then switched to using ffmpeg2theora hoping that would fix the issue, but it didn’t. I then tried encoding them for the WebM codec, but that still didn’t work. In a final attempt I took the H.264(.mp4) file that HandBrake output(since it was working great) and used Miro Video Converter to convert it to a OGG(.ogv) file. This new version worked in Firefox, so what I thought was an issue with Firefox or my hosting just turned out to be an encoding problem.

I also ran into an issue viewing the H.264 version in IE9, but it turned out to be a Compatibility View issue that I documented here

I still have a ton to learn about Azure Storage, HTML5 Video and Codecs, but I think this was a good start.

6 thoughts on “Stream HTML5 Video from Azure Blob Storage

  1. Has anyone figured out how to make them seekable? I noticed that if the MP4 is hosted by IIS 7 you can seek, but if the MP4 is hosted by Azure blob storage or CDN, you cannot seek in IE9.

  2. Pingback: SharePoint 2013 and Windows Azure Media Services | MSDN Blogs

  3. Pingback: Windows Azure and Cloud Computing Posts for 8/13/2012+ - Windows Azure Blog

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>